The Gender-based Medicine LCT seeks to advance the medical student’s capacity to identify and address sex and gender-based differences in health care needs. The curriculum also encourages students to become sensitive to diversity and cultural and social factors including gender and gender power relations which affect health and illness worldwide.

 

Learning objectives:
  • Discuss basic gender concepts: gender power relations, gender roles, access and control, manifestations of gender bias, gender equity and equality, gender as a social determinant of health.
  • Explain sex and gender differences in normal development, health and illness (pathophysiology and psychopathology) as they apply to prevention and management of health problems:
    • Compare differences in biological function, development and pharmacological response in women and men
    • Discuss the pathophysiology, etiology, differential diagnosis and treatment options for conditions that are more common, more serious and/or have interventions that differ by sex/gender
    • Discuss the pathophysiology, etiology, differential diagnosis and treatment options for conditions that are specific to each sex/gender.
  • Effectively communicate with patients, demonstrating awareness of the doctor-patient power differential and gender and cultural differences. This will be demonstrated, for example, through use of language by the physician that minimizes power imbalances, validates patient experiences and minimizes gender stereotypes.
  • Perform a sex-specific and gender-appropriate history and physical examination.
  • Discuss the impact of gender-based societal and cultural roles and beliefs on health and health care of patients.
  • Discuss the impact of gender-based societal and cultural roles and beliefs on the health and well-being of physicians.
  • Identify and assist victims of physical, emotional and sexual violence and abuse.
  • Assess and counsel patients for sex- and gender-appropriate reduction of risk, including lifestyle changes and genetic testing.
  • Assess and critically evaluate new information through a ‘gender lens’: identifying gender biases and gaps and adopting best practices that incorporate knowledge or sex and gender differences in health and disease.
  • Discuss the differential impact by gender of health care delivery systems on populations and individuals receiving health care.